"Hey kid, how many gold Napoleons will it take for you to stop calling me your uncle Nappy?"
Napoleon trying to reason with the kiddos.

"Hey kid, how many gold Napoleons will it take for you to stop calling me your uncle Nappy?"

Napoleon trying to reason with the kiddos.

16 notes

Napoleon Anecdotes

VISIT TO THE ASYLUM FOR THE DAUGHTERS OF OFFICERS KILLED IN BATTLE

Although occupied with so many weighty affairs, the Emperor Napoleon nevertheless did not neglect minor objects, visiting the various public works, which, upon his re-entrance into Paris on his return from Elba, were put into a state of activity. He also repaired to the several institutions, and among others to the Musee Napoleon, where he continued for two hours, expressing his highest satisfaction at the arrangements which had there taken place. But upon presenting himself at the establishment which he had formerly set on foot for the reception of the female offspring of officers killed in the service, a most affecting scene took place.  The asylum in question is near St. Denis, at the Chateau of St. Ecouen, formerly a seat of the celebrated family of Montmorency.

No sooner was it known that Napoleon had arrived to honour the institution with his presence, than all the young ladies, en masse, rushed forward to testify their gratitude to their munificent benefactor; it was in vain that the persons placed as their guardians, and for the purpose of superintending their education, had recourse to threats and entreaties in order to restrain this natural flow of affection; neither coercive nor soothing measure were productive of the desired effect; they were, therefore, abandoned to the unrestrained demonstration of their exuberant feelings, which were carried to such a height that the emperor, oppressed by the sentiment, burst into tears. Finding himself relieved, he mingled with the youthful crowd, embracing some, and presenting to others his hand to be kissed, and thus emboldened by his condescending familiarity, his young protegees began by rifling him of his pocket-handkerchief, which was immediately torn into ribands, and then subdivided, to be delivered in pieces to the craving applicants; not contented with this, the skirt of his coat was also put into a state of requisition; for, while occupied in caressing those in front, a phalanx in the rear literally curtailed, with a pair of shears, several inches from the bottom of his grey surtout, to all which he submitted with heartfelt delight; and on retiring to regain his carriage (being unable to suppress them), tears again found vent, when, placing his hand to his eyes, he was heard to articulate these words: “Voici le comble de bonheur—ceux ci sont les plus beaux momens de ma vie!” "This  is the acme of bliss—these are the happiest moments of my life."

Napoleon Anecdotes, W.H. Ireland, pages 42-46

Chateau St. Ecouen

Source 1

Source 2

5 notes

Napoleon poses with a pair of ghost boots.
Napoléon,
Charles Hoffbauer.
source

Napoleon poses with a pair of ghost boots.

Napoléon,

Charles Hoffbauer.

source

7 notes

"Are you sure your horse wants to go swimming, Your Majesty? He doesn’t look like he does!"
Napoleon’s idea of a day at the beach.

"Are you sure your horse wants to go swimming, Your Majesty? He doesn’t look like he does!"

Napoleon’s idea of a day at the beach.

17 notes

That time Napoleon thought: Holy shit, that’s a huge eagle falling into the ocean!!”

That time Napoleon thought: Holy shit, that’s a huge eagle falling into the ocean!!”

21 notes

Napoleon Anecdotes

CLEMENCY OF NAPOLEON TOWARD PRINCE DE HARTZBERG

This prince, who was governor of Berlin for the King of Prussia, having entered into a conspiracy, and being discovered, his wife obtained an audience of Napoleon, when, after asserting his innocence, the latter, producing some papers from his escritoire, said, “Now read and judge, madame, whether he is guilty or not.” On beholding these documents the unfortunate lady became speech-less, upon which the emperor continued thus: “Well, madame, in my situation how would you act?” “Sire,” answered the princess without hesitating, “I would burn the papers, in order that I might have the glory of pardoning him.” “Yes,” retorted the emperor, “on condition that no more is said on the subject.” Upon which he cast the documents into the flames, and thus impeded the course of justice by annihilating every existing proof of his guilt.

Napoleon Anecdotes, W.H. Ireland, pages 41-42

7 notes