I don’t know. A new web series where Napoleon grows a beard, travels to modern day Elba where he and his female friend battle zombies on the beach.

All thanks to some secret powerful crest.

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"Yes, well, fancy meeting you here on my front lawn."
Unwanted Infantry killing all the good grass.
source

"Yes, well, fancy meeting you here on my front lawn."

Unwanted Infantry killing all the good grass.

source

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That time Napoleon was all “Oh my God, where are we? The freaking North Pole?”

That time Napoleon was all “Oh my God, where are we? The freaking North Pole?”

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That time Napoleon placed the statue himself on his completed arch.
"I think this shall go here nicely."

That time Napoleon placed the statue himself on his completed arch.

"I think this shall go here nicely."

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Napoleon Anecdotes

POWERFUL FASCINATION IN THE MANNER OF BUONAPARTE

In the beginning of the summer of 1802, some officers of rank, enthusiastic republicans, took considerable umbrage at several instances of Buonaparte’s conduct; in consequence of which the whole of the discontented determined to go and remonstrate with him upon the points that had given them offence, and to speak their minds to him very freely. In the evening of the same day that this expostulation was to have taken place, one of the party gave the following account of the interview:

"I do not know whence it arises, but there is a charm about that man which is indescribable and irresistible. I am no admirer of his; I dislike the power to which he has risen; yet I cannot help confessing that there is a something in him which seems to speak him born to command. We went into his apartment, determined to declare our minds to him freely; to expostulate with him warmly, and not to depart till our subjects of complaint were removed. But in his manner of receiving us there was a certain je ne sais quoi, a degree of fascination which disarmed us in a moment; nor could we utter one word of what we had intended to say. He talked to us for a long time with an eloquence peculiarly his own, explaining with the utmost clearness and precision the necessity for steadily pursuing the line of conduct he had adopted; and, without controverted our opinions so ably, that we had not a word to say in reply; so that we left him, instead expostulating with him, and fully convinced, at least for the moment, that he was in the right, and that we were in the wrong.”

A similar kind of fascination was experienced by the merchants at Rouen, when he made his progress through the north of France in the autumn of the same year. They had intended to remonstrate warmly against some regulations which had recently been made respecting the commerce of the mother country with her colonies, but, when they talked with him upon the subject, he received them in a manner which won so much upon them, and gave them such satisfactory reasons for what he had done, that they left him, convinced that he understood their interests much better than they did themselves.

During his campaign in Italy, in 1797, the Directory, beginning to grow jealous of his rising fame and popularity, despatched General Clarke from Paris to the army upon some frivolous pretence, but in reality to inquire and to make a report upon the general’s proceedings. General Clarke not only found nothing exceptionable in his conduct, but saw so much to admire and applaud, that he became enthusiastically attached to him, and ever afterward devoted himself entirely to following his fortunes. In like manner, the Emperor of Russia, from being his great antagonist, became, on being personally acquainted with him, his warm admirer.—Plumptre’s Three Years’ Residence in France.

Napoleon Anecdotes, W. H. Ireland, pages 52-57

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"Very good Claude, I am glad you were able to tie all the horses up. I don’t know if it deserves a Legion of Honor though, but it definitely deserves a thumps up!"
Thumbs up, Claude. Thumbs up.

"Very good Claude, I am glad you were able to tie all the horses up. I don’t know if it deserves a Legion of Honor though, but it definitely deserves a thumps up!"

Thumbs up, Claude. Thumbs up.

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INSEE sends a letter to Napoleon Bonaparte

192 years after the death of Napoleon Bonaparte, INSEE has sent a mail census.

"Napoleon Bonaparte

3 rue Saint-Charles

20000 Ajaccio “

INSEE has clearly problems in updating its files. 192 years after the death of Napoleon Bonaparte , she sent an e-census former general says Wednesday Corse Matin . The letter was posted by the National Institute of Statistics and Economic Studies December 2, 2013 in Midi-Pyrenees.

But obviously INSEE is not only to ignore that is Napoleon Bonaparte : the post office returned the letter by stating that “the addressee is unknown at this address”. Fortunately an informed defendant to factor the new address of the former statesman person. “Died in 1821, please forward it to St. Peter”, he has written on the envelope. Or Invalides where his body lies.
**translated from original French source by Google**

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