Louis (Luigi) Bonaparte
               September 2, 1778—July 25, 1846

                             Louis (Luigi) Bonaparte

               September 2, 1778—July 25, 1846

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"Um…so now what? Do we march over there or just sit here? This is rather boring."

"Um…so now what? Do we march over there or just sit here? This is rather boring."

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Napoleon Anecdotes

HARANGUE ON THE FIELD OF BATTLE

The following speech, delivered by the French emperor to his army when commanding his legions in Italy, may well rank upon a par with many addresses made by Julius Caesar to his soldiers under various circumstances:

"Soldiers! whatsoever may be the strength of the enemy, attack him without hesitation, and you are certain of commanding the victory: death never strikes the brave, but when his appointed hour is at hand. How many times have you not already dared his efforts, and forced him back into the ranks of your enemies."

Napoleon Anecdotes, W. H. Ireland (page 18)

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Notre Dame, Paris, France

Cathedral where Napoleon was crowned Emperor of the French

Source

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"Water? I don’t need your water kid, I need some vodka! But water it down of course."

"Water? I don’t need your water kid, I need some vodka! But water it down of course."

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Big hats and small islands make for bad bedfellows.

Big hats and small islands make for bad bedfellows.

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Napoleon Anecdotes

THE BRIDGE OF ARCOLA

The commander-in-chief of an army should very rarely expose himself; nevertheless there are situations where his presence, alone, decides the fate of a battle, which will be fully illustrated by the following example.

The passage of the bridge of Arcola may be esteemed the height of boldness. Thousands of men and musketry served to defend the approach to this particular spot, which was completely fenced by cannon in every direction; thrice had General Buonaparte commanded the charge in person, and thrice had his followers, disdaining to retreat, fallen sacrifices to their temerity; the death-dealing bullets continued their destructive career, levelling all those who dared to encounter their vengeful flight. Napoleon, at length growing indignant, gave utterance to an exclamation of fury, and instantly tearing one of the standards from the grasp of an ensign, sprang upon his bridge, the scene of carnage and slaughter; when, planting the flag in defiance of destiny itself, which seemed to oppose him, he thus addressed his soldiers:

"Frenchmen! Grenadiers! will you, then. abandon your colours?"
This appeal seemed to convey a reproach ill adapted to the spirit of such courageous men; wherefore, before the general was enable to repeat them, all thought of danger had vanished, death was faced in every direction, the bridge of Arcola was forced, and victory once more crowned the republican standard.

Napoleon Anecdotes, W.H. Ireland, pages 11-13

            Napoléon François Charles Joseph Bonaparte
                  March 20, 1811—-July 22, 1832

            Napoléon François Charles Joseph Bonaparte

                  March 20, 1811—-July 22, 1832

32 notes